Dresden – Baroque Pearl! Things to see.

written by womenofpoland 26 November 2017
Dresden – my recommendations

I’ve already been to Dresden 3 times. However, I still haven’t seen 3 spots from this list. 😛 There was always something that prevented me from getting to these places. Is it a sign that I have to go to Dresden the fourth time? 😀 I wouldn’t mind! Dresden is full of monuments! Can you believe that this Baroque Dresden and its biggest attractions were built by polish king August II Strong? In XVIII century Saxony and Poland used to have the Polish-Saxon Union due the same king. It is hard to believe that Dresden was completely destroyed during World War II, because its current look is just amazing. Dresden rebuilt its all attraction and nowadays it’s known among the Europe as the Venice of North. 🙂

How to get to Dresden?

In my case this part was easy, because I was traveling from Leipzig where I’ve been on my second Erasmus. I was traveling by Deutsche Bahn train on Sachsen Ticket. Here you can read how those tickets works.

Dresden has also it’s own airport, however they don’t have very cheap flights. But it’s always good to check the opportunities. You can also check Flixbus that offers many connection to Dresden!

Firts let me eat something! 😀 – HANS IM GLÜCK Burgergrill

Three times in Dresden, three times lunch in this place. 😀 Am I addicted to this place? Hard to estimate… Anyway, at this place the burgers won’t fail you. Choose from a variety of flavors and combinations your perfect burger. Additionally, you will eat at very design place.

Source: https://img.prinz.de/vfCTTO9bWA2Dqq33Ze_TqiKT5hY=/smart/filters:brightness(5):contrast(5)/https://media.prinz.de/articles/2014-10/hans_im_gluck_burgergrill_ambiente.jpg

Source: https://i.pinimg.com/originals/91/0f/b1/910fb1638936c246f496d4dd8502995a.jpg

Things to see

While visiting Dresden, I used the great phone application – Triposo. I mention this app almost in every content (though believe me, I have no profit from it yet), but I think it is brilliant. You can save all the attractions on the map and thanks to that you won’t miss anything. 😉 GPS is running without internet. App is free. 😛

We started our trip from the Central Station. That’s why our first stop was Zwinger.

Zwinger

The construction of this majestic palace was begun in 1709 on the order of August II of the Strong. August II fascinated by the French and Italian baroque, decided to transform his residence (Dresden) into a modern, Baroque city. Instead of investing in the army, he devoted in to urban development and culture. He didn’t even care about the fortifications of the city, as evidenced by the fact that he built his palace on the former interurban, what actually means the name Zwinger.

Unfortunately, Dresden was almost completely destroyed during the WWII. Interestingly, the reconstruction of Zwinger was commissioned by the Soviet city commander! At present, it is the biggest attraction of Dresden. In addition, the entrance to the Zwinger is completely free. Take a walk around the upper. Don’t miss the most beautiful place of baroque joy of life, the so-called Nymphs, or Nymph Bath.

Zwinger is also a house of big Dresden Paintings collection. This part is paid of course. I’m not a big fan of paintings so I didn’t enter the museum.

On the way to Zwinger we passed nice buildings.

Zwinger

Zwinger

During the first visit the weather was just horrible…

Zwinger

Zwinger

Zwinger

Zwinger

Zwinger

Zwinger

Nympheum

View from the Zwinger

Dresden Castle

In front of the Zwinger is located another interesting building. It is a castle and former residence of the Wettins – princes of Saxony. The tradition of the castle dates back 800 years ago. The archaeological excavations reaveled the foundations of the previous castle from that period. The castle was gradually enlarged from the 14th century. In 1701 the building almost burned down. It was rebuilt by our king – August II Strong Sas. Today it is the Museum of Modern Art.

Dresden Castle

Dresden Castle

Dresden Castle

Semperoper

When I was preparing this content I got the impression that Dresden witnessed many devastation. An example of this is the Semper Opera. It was built in the years 1838-41 in the shape of a rotunda modeled on the buildings of the early Italian Renaissance. The first version of Opera survived only 28 years – the building burned down. In 1871 the construction began again. However, the first architect, Gottfried Semper, was exiled outside the Saxon lands, so work was undertaken by his eldest son Manfred. The construction was completed in 1913. As you may guess, the second building also didn’t survive the trials of time. It was completely destroyed during the WWII. Opera was reopened again in 1985.

Semperoper

Cathedral of the Holy Trinity

Probably everyone likes when the monuments are accumulated in one place right? Once, you get more and faster, and two that you don’t need to walk too much. 😀 Next to the Opera, Zwinger and the Castle is located the baroque Opera. Like most of the monuments was erected in the eighteenth century, but this time not by Augustus II, but Augustus III. Just like most other monuments were destroyed during the raids in WW II. Its reconstruction lasted until 1965. The entrance is free.

Cathedral of the Holy Trinity

Fürstenzug

Fürstenzug was designed by the painter Wilhem Walther. It perfectly presents all the rulers of the Wettyn dynasty. And all this to celebrate the 800th anniversary of the rule of this dynasty. Unfortunately, it turned out that picture used to be sensitive to atmospheric conditions and soon began to deteriorate. Fortunately, some 30 years later someone came up with the idea of moving the image to 25 000 thousands Meissen porcelain tiles. In this way, the Fürstenzug became the largest porcelain image of the world. At the same time, it is a great source for historians in terms of the appearance, clothing and equipment of the old generations of the Wettyn’s.

Fürstenzug

Fürstenzug

Fürstenzug

Frauenkirche

For 3 visits in Dresden, only once I managed to get inside. The church is often closed because of rehearsals or concerts. Also, if you manage to get in, then feel lucky! Especially since the entrance is free. You can also go to the tower for an extra fee (probably 6-8 euros).

The St. Mary’s Church (as it was supposed to translate the Frauenkirche) was created during the baroque reconstruction of Dresden, specifically in the years 1726-43. However, in the eleventh century, there was a much smaller Romanesque church in its place. Due to the expansion of the parish and the inability to further expand the church, it was decided to demolish it at the beginning of the 18th century. In this way was built the largest sandstone building in the world next to the Strasbourg Cathedral. Like other monuments, it was completely destroyed during the WWII.

Ruins of Frauenkirche. Source: http://www.coopzeitung.ch/site/presse/get/3567406/1218CZ_R5_dres_FrauenkircheKaputt_Keystone.jpg

Frauenkirche

Frauenkirche

Frauenkirche

Frauenkirche

Frauenkirche

Frauenkirche

Frauenkirche

Academy of Fine Arts

The building of Academy of Fine Arts will definitely grab your attention. The best way to admire it is from the opposite bank of the Elbe, from which it looks even more impressive!

Academy of Fine Arts

On the other side of the Elbe

While in Dresden, you must go to the other side of the Elbe so that you can admire the panorama of the Baroque Town in all its splendor. Along the Elbe River, there is also the most beautiful bike route. A short break in this place is a must! I recommend to buy ice cream in the Eiscafe Venezia and sit on the grass. 🙂 Also notice the flowing steamboats. Dresden has the largest fleet in the world of these ships! You can take a cruise on them to Meissen. 🙂

Monument on the Augustus bridge that remind of the great flood

This is how you should relax here 😉

This is how you should relax here 😉

Best views

Streamboats

Golden Rider

There is a reason why the Baroque city of Augustus II was established on the right bank of the Elbe River. The old town was completely devastated by the fire. At the command of August, the city was rebuilt, and the inhabitants quickly christened them “New Town”. The Golden Rider (August II) admires now the city from the opposite site of the river.

Golden Rider

That’s all what I saw on my own eyes. 😀 Now, I would like to show what else can you see in Dresden. I regret so much that I didn’t have a chance to see this things.

Yenidze Factory

It was built in 1907-1909 as a tobacco factory, only that it looks like a mosque. Since 1997 it has been used as an office building. If you come to Dresden by train, you can admire from the window. I also admired Yenidze only from the train window… 🙁

Yenidze. Source: http://ewawojciechowska.pl/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Yenidze-foto-Foter-1024×832.jpg

The most beautiful Dairy World Store

In the 19th century, Dresden became a significant metropolis. It soon became clear that the problem was to supply such a large population with milk. Before it reached the city, it wasn’t fresh and the locals were sick. An ingenious farmer, Paul Pfund, decided to move to Dresden with his two cows. A modest business, soon turned out to be a vein of gold, and the company grew in strength. His opened a dairy shop, which was entirely build of tiles, that were produced by Dresden artists.

In the soviet times, the store was closed, but immediately after the reunification, it was opened again. Since 1998 Pfunds Molkerei is listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the “most beautiful dairy shop” in the world. 🙂

Pfunds Molkerei. Source: https://www.pfunds.de/milchladen/images/laden/010a.jpg

Kunsthofpassage

It’s one of the most unusual places in Dresden, and I didn’t see it! I feel a huge disappointment! ;P Kunsthofpassage is 5 courtyards between the streets: Görlitzer Straße 23/25 and Alaunstraße 70 decorated in an amazing way. The most impressive is the blue building with pipes / trumpets that supposedly are playing in the rain! There are also plenty of shops and art studios. Very cool and alternative place to the baroque part of town!

Kunsthofpassage, Source: https://i.pinimg.com/736x/1e/7d/ea/1e7dea9cacbfeaa7016041d5002133cd–places-to-go-dresden.jpg

That’s all! I hope you enjoyed and it’s useful for your trip to Dresden. Let us know how you liked the city or don’t hesitate to ask us a question (or questions). 😀

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