1 day in Nuremberg. Things to see.

written by womenofpoland 26 October 2017
Things to see in Nuremberg

Nuremberg has long been on my travel list. I’ve been so many times in Munich, but I couldn’t decide to visit only 156 km away Nuremberg. In the winter of 2016 I finally did it. The weather was not the best, but at least it didn’t rain and the temperature wasn’t that unpleasent. If you are planning to visit Nuremberg completely (ie the entrance to museums, etc.) then 1 day may be insufficient. If you are planning just to walk around historic part of town (as we did) then one day is fine. Let me show you now what are the top attractions of this city, so basicaly what you can’t miss! 🙂

How to get to Nuremberg?

In my case the way to Nuremberg was easy and simply. My Grandma and I were traveling from Munich by Deutsche Bahn train. We bought a special weekend ticket (Bayern ticket) and around 2 h later we were on spot. If you want to read about traveling by train and special offers in Germany click here.

If you are traveling alone you can check also Flixbus. It might have cheaper ticket for single traveler, but the journey will be longer.

Don’t worry if you want to come from different country! I noticed that the Nuremberg airport has lots of great deals! 🙂

Sightseeing! Ready, Steady, Gooooo! – Fortifications

Although the distance between Munich and Nuremberg is small, you will easily notice that the climate of Nuremberg is different. I’m not saying that it’s colder or warmer. 😀 . It’s all about architecture. However your first impressions after you left the railway station might be: “What is this girl talking about? Wide street, modern cars, regular buildings and some there fortifications. Why this city is different?…” 😀

Fortifications

As soon as you finish complaining try to find a gate to the city. It’s not that far from the railways station and you don’t need any public tranport to reach it. The whole city is walkable so you don’t have to buy a ticket. When you enter the city you will feel the old climate of Franconia (administrative region)! 🙂

Regular buildings but very beautiful! 🙂

Elisabethkirche

Our first attraction was huge Elisabethkirche (church). The chapel was dedicated to Elisabeth of Hungary already in the thirteenth century! After the Reformation, it was the only Catholic church in Protestant Nuremberg. In the 18th century, due to the poor condition, it was demolished and then rebuilded. We can say not that old church but with long history! The entrance to the church is free, so I recommend to enter and see the Romanesque dome also from the inside! 🙂

Elisabethkirche

Elisabethkirche

Ehekarussell

This is a beautiful fountain, whose main attraction are the very expressive characters. It’s not that far from the church and I’m sure will notice this beauty when walking in the city. Definitely it deserves your attention. Even my grandmother was thrilled when she saw it. 😀 The fountain was built in the 20th century.

Ehekarussell

Weißgerbergasse

This is one of these attractions that you just can’t miss! Nuremberg during the WW II suffered greatly, but the 20 Prussian houses on the Weißgerbergasse survived. The Weißgerbergasse reflects the fragment of historic Nuremberg. The name of the avenue comes from the white weavers who lived there in the Middle Ages. Today there are mainly pubs, restaurants, shops, etc.

Weißgerbergasse

Little Venice

The old town crosses the Pegnitz River. Cottages that stand on the edge and some of them even in the river, they immediately recall Venice. Well, maybe in slightly different edition and climate, but I really see a certain similarity. 🙂

Little Venice

Little Venice

Little Venice

Little Venice

Church of St. Sebald
It is also worth visiting the church of St. Sebald – the patron of Nuremberg. This Romanesque Gothic church was already known in the twelfth century. During WW II it suffered serious damage, but as you can see, since the 1950s it has been renovated and still serves the faithful. With the fact that since the Reformation the church belongs to the evangelical community. The entrance is free, so I encourage you to take a look.

Church of St. Sebald

Church of St. Sebald

Church of St. Sebald

Church of St. Sebald

House of Albrecht Dürer

Nuremberg is also home to one of the most famous woodcutters in history – Albrecht Dürer. I believe that those who had an extended history in high school (like me) associate this Lord? 😉 In any case, in his beautiful Prussian house representing medieval Nuremberg style is located his museum. You can admire there the work of Albrecht. Unfortunately, I didn’t enter, but I will do it next time! 🙂

Albrecht Dürer House

Historic Bunkers of Art

Nuremberg is a city that really loves this Prussian style. 😀 In front of our woodcutter home, there are two historic art bunkers. You don’t have to enter them, just admire them from the outside! This is a typical Prussian style.🙂

Historic Bunkers of Art

Nürnberger Burg

In free translation the name simply means Nuremberg hill. But under this name there is an important landmark of the city, namely Castle. Together with the walls of the city is considered one of the most powerful medieval fortifications in Europe. The first buildings in this place appeared about 1000 years ago. Then in the second half of the 13th century the castle was expanded several times. After the Thirty Years’ War (in the 17th century) the castle lost its importance. During World War II the castle was completely destroyed and its reconstruction took 30 years!

Castle

Castle

View from the castle

View from the castle

View from the castle

Frauenkirche

So the Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary (eh, I prefer the German version). 😀 Gothic church located in the center of the city founded in the 14th century by Charles IV Luxembourg. As a result of the work, a small building was created, which is a kind of court chapel. Noteworthy is the golden clock, which appeared a little later. The entrance is free, so it’s worth to enter, however I have to admit that the interior is not as impressive as you might think. 🙂

In the same square is held one of the most beautiful Christmas Market!

Frauenkirche

Frauenkirche

Beautiful Well

In front of the cathedral is located the Beautiful Well (so exactly its name from the German translation). It is a former town well built in the 14th century. Unfortunately, during my vist it was completely covered because of the reconstructions work – bad luck. 🙁

Source: http://www.petraschuster.de/grafiken/nbg_schoener_brunnen_kl.jpg

The hospital of St. Ghost

It’s one of the nicest building that Nuremberg can offer! Beautifully located, historic building on the Pegnitz River. Nowadays there is a restaurant which mainly serves German dishes.

The hospital of St. Ghost

Church of St. Lawrence

This is the last temple during our visit. There are quite a lot of them in the city center and they  all deserve at least 5 minutes of attention. This time we are dealing with a powerful Gothic church, whose origins date back to the 13th century. Again I encourage you to visit interiors because you don’t have to pay for it! 🙂

Church of St. Lawrence

Such a nice building in front of the Church of St. Lawrence 🙂

That’s all! I hope you enjoyed my short guide of Nuremberg. Sorry for this grey pictures, but as I said it was winter time so the weather can be like this. But I hope I will come back to Nuremberg one day to take more sunny pics and then I will update you guys with them! 🙂

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