Europe Germany Munich

Munich – the city you will love it! Best guide.

27 August 2017
Why do we love Munich? 🙂

Munich, the capital of Bavaria – the most beautiful Land in Germany. It can be compared to the German version of “American Dream”. Only here you will find same number of luxuries shops as like the regular shops (Zara, Mango…). Nothing surprising. Many big company’s (like BMW) has its headquarters here so residents can earn lots of money for a 5 star vacations in the US. Nevertheles, you don’t have to leave to gain valuable education! Technische Universität München and Ludwig Universtät are world-famous universities! It is truly amazing that in spite of a passion for tradition and a conservative lifestyle, Munich has achieved a high level of development. It may sound a bit boring, but try visiting Munich at the end of September, during the Oktoberfest. Then you will find out what I mean by Bavarian conservatism. I’m also sure that you will love the city and it’s “must see” places. Finally, when you will be tired of big city life, check what is outside. Bavarian, small cities also deserve attention. But let’s focus on Munich! 🙂

Short Intro

I visited Munich 17 times or maybe even more … All this is thanks to my grandmother, who has moved to this city more than 20 years ago. Fortunately, she choosed Munich, because unfortunately there are no cheap flights or even buses. Prices of hotels or other places leave much to be desired. I would certainly visit Munich sooner or later even without my grandma, but it wouldn’t be that many times. If I want to sum up all my stays in Munich, it would probably have been over a year. Therefore, this is the second city after Cracow, which I know very well and where I spent so much time. Don’t be suprised when you will see the pictures from different part of time.

How to get to Munich?

It’s not an easy task if you are a budget traveler, but here are few hints:

  • Flights to Munich are way expensive for you? Try to find cheap Ryanair flights to Memmingen or Nurnberg. From this cities you will easily in less than 2h get to Munich.
  • Check Flixbus because they have lots of good connections.
  • Deutsche Bahn can be also a nice alternative.
U-bahn and S-bahn are your friends!

Munich is a huge city and without public transport you will not see all the places below. Fortunately on this issue with the help comes subway, which will take you to all the major attractions. I recommend to familiarize yourself with the map of the subway and have it always in your pocket! 🙂

Bayerischer Landtag

Let’s start with politics. ☺️ At the Max-Weber-Platz station is located a beautiful building called Maximilianeum. Since 1819 is the seat of the Bavarian parliament. Its responsibilities can be compared to the Bundestag, but in limited form only to Bavaria. The Bavarian parliament is responsible for enacting laws and voting on the budget of the Free State. It also selects the Bavarian Prime Minister and confirms members of the Bavarian government.

Bayerischer Landtag

Isaara

From Ludwig Universität to Karlsplatz Stachus

Best travel path with best attractions in Munich? 🙂 I recommend to get off at Universität station and walk up to Karlsplatz Stachus. This isn’t a great distance, but with photos break it can take longer.

Triumphal arch

If we get off at the Universität station, it’s worth taking a few steps back in the direction of the Arc de Triomphe. A great masterpiece of Friedrich von Gärtner, an outstanding German architect who modeled on the arch of Constantine the Great. Built in the nineteenth century, it proudly presents itself today next to the University.

It is also worth to pay attention to the Church of St. Ludwik, who is located right near. Uuni

Triumphal arch

🙂

Church of St. Ludwik

Geschwister Scholl Platz

We are heading towards the city center. On the way we pass an interesting square, which on the opposite side of the street has its mirror image. It is a Geschwister Scholl Platz – already its name suggests the similarity (siblings) of the square. This is not a “must see place”, but it’s on your way to the city center, so it’s nice to notice this square. 🙂

Geschwister Scholl Platz

Geschwister Scholl Platz

Odeonsplatz

It is one of the most important squares in Munich. The square was founded at the beginning of the 19th century, but the most famous events took place 100 years later. This is the place where Hitler’s political career began. On November 9, 1923, the Munich Prize was dispersed at the Odeonsplatz. About two thousand Nazis marched to the centre of Munich, where they confronted the police, which resulted in the death of 20 people. The putsch brought Hitler to the attention of the German nation and generated front page headlines in newspapers around the world.

At the square there is also located the huge St. Cajetan church. The temple were built in the seventeenth century. During the war the church has been bombed several times and to this day it is not rare to see it under scaffolding. It is worth to look inside for interesting interiors, as well as the Wittelsbach graves.

Odeonsplatz

St. Cajetan church

The Residenzstr

Time to discover Marienplatz. But we can do it in two ways. You can go along Theatinerstr. or Residenzstr. I definitely recommend the second one, because you can also see the Opera and the Art Hall. These aren’t the “must see” places, but as they are on the way, it is nice to see them. 🙂 However, if you are in shopping mood then check Theatinerstr.! 😛

Opera 🙂

Opera

The Hall of Art

Residenzstr.

Marienplatz

After a few minutes walk along the Residenzstr. you will finally reach the famous Marienplatz. It’s a big square, but you won’t notice that until thousands of poeple go home. 😛 It’s hard to take a photo here or even go fast. Due to the shops, touristic attractions, etc. this place will be always crowded, even in winter.

At the Marienplatz there are two Town Halls – old and new. The new Town Hall is a gigantic building and a proud landmark of Munich. The Neo-Gothic building was built up for 40 years and was ready for use in the early 20th century.

Nearby is a modest building of the old town hall. However, it can not be unnoticed! Its tower dates back to the twelfth century. The rest of the Town Hall, unchanged the appearance since the 15th century. Until 1874 was the headquarters of the city council. Nowadays is a toy museum.

New Town Hall

New Town Hall

New Town Hall

New Town Hall

Old Town Hall

Peterskirche

Munich from the bird’s eye view? I’m pretty sure that most of you have already seen a picture of Munich from above? For such shots you don’t need to have a dron. Just visit the nearby St. Peter’s Church, specifically its tower, for which you have to pay 1-2 euros. As for the Munich standards it’s super cheap, and the views are really great! Worth the effort that awaits you on the way! 😀

View from Peterskirche

View from Peterskirche

Frauenkirche – Munich Cathedral

The best place to admire the Frauenkirche in a full glory is the tower of St. Peter’s church. It is difficult to admire the church from the pedestrian position because of tightly surrounded buildings The Frauenkirche was built in the 15th century. An interesting legend tells a story of the cathedral construction:

  • Pact with the devil

Halsbach was forced to make a pact with the devil as soon as he received permission to build the cathedral. No matter what was the reason for the contract, the devil was supposed to help Halsbach. The price was big, because the cathedral couldn’t have any single window. He didn’t want any natural or divine light to enter the building. In case of failed obligation, Halsbach had to give up his soul to the devil.

The devil immediately accepted the deal, bearing in mind that the cathedral without windows is, as we would say today, like a car without wheels.

Halsbach managed to finish the cathedral in  20 years, which is a pretty good time if we consider that the construction of the cathedral sometimes takes the generation.

When the object was completed, the devil stood at the entrance of the Frauenkirche (he couldn’t enter the sacred building for obvious reasons) and he didn’t actually notice any window. At least not from where he stood.

Halsbach was a very clever and ingenious man. He hide a huge stained glass behind the altar, and he designed the inner columns of the cathedral with special impressions, so no one could see the window.

The devil left the place disappointed and frustrated, leaving behind the sign exactly in this place, where it is difficult to see any window. And the brilliant Jörg Von Halsbach thanks to that fate kept his soul forever. 😀

Frauenkirche and New City Hall

Kaufingerstr. -> Neuhauserstr.

Now, turn to the Kaufingerstr. If you have come in the sale season, take a look at the shops. You can save lots of money and buy ton’s of clothes!!

Going along Kaufingerstr. and then Neuhauserstr. don’t skip these 3 buildings:

  • Hirmer building – another shopping mall, very elegant and well maintained. Beautifully decorated with red flowers in the summer.

Hirmer

  • Church of St. Michael– the first outstanding Renaissance building in Munich! It is one of the largest renaissance church. It was built in the 16th century, it was later a model for many Jesuit buildings in Europe.

Church of St. Michael

Church of St. Michael

  • Bürgersaalkirche – no way to skip the pink rococo church. The eighteenth-century church is even more beautiful inside!

Bürgersaalkirche

Bürgersaalkirche

Karlsplatz Stachus

Going further Neuhauserstr. you will reach another important square in Munich – Karlsplatz Stachus. Often referred to simply Stachus by the locals. Going from the city side you will pass through the gate, which is the old city gate of the Old Town. In the center of the square is located a large fountain, which in the summer is crowded by the city residents. The characteristic building of the square is the Palace of Justice (Justizpalast). It belongs to the most famous and most impressive buildings of the late 19th century.

Karlsplatz Stachus

Karlsplatz Stachus

Palace of Justice

Olympiazentrum

Being in Munich don’t forget to visit the famous Olympic Village. From the city center you will get metro no. 3 till the Olympiazentrum. From the subway station prepare for a 10-15 min walk. It is worth to start the tour from the Olympic Tower. Entrance costs 9 euros. The nearby stadium, the Olympic Village and the whole rest of Munich are really unforgettable view. These are not typical views of the city center. In return you will receive a dose of impressive architecture from the last century. 🙂

It is also worthwhile to climb up to a nearby hill from which you will see the panorama of the park. 🙂

Olympiazentrum

Olympiazentrum

Olympiazentrum

Olympiazentrum

Olympiazentrum

BMW Welt Museum

By the way, visit also the BWM Museum! Although I’m not a fan of cars, I have to admit that the BMW Welt Museum made a huge impression on me! The whole place is full of luxury and modern technologies. Part of the museum is free at all, but it is worth spending those 10 euros to see everything. My favorite was a multi-level glass display case with motorcycles. It looks really cosmic! 🙂 Besides, I also liked the old vintage BMWs that you can admire in the Museum. Although the museum doesn’t belong to the largest, you will certainly lose a lot of time there! 🙂

BMW Welt Museum

BMW Welt Museum

BMW Welt Museum

BMW Welt Museum

BMW Welt Museum

BMW Welt Museum

BMW Welt Museum

BMW Welt Museum

BMW Welt Museum

BMW Welt Museum

BMW Welt Museum

BMW Welt Museum

Nymphenburg Palace

A little on the way and a little on the outskirts of the city, but definitely worth your time! 😛  The palace is the main summer residence of the former rulers of Bavaria of the House of Wittelsbach. The palace, together with its park, is now one of the most famous sights of Munich. The baroque facades comprise an overall width of about 700 metres. Some rooms still show their original baroque decoration while others were later redesigned in rococo or neoclassical style.

Nymphenburg Palace

Nymphenburg Palace

Nymphenburg Palace

Nymphenburg Palace

Englischer Garten

If you are in Munich in spring or summer or just enjoying the beautiful weather, you have to visit one of the largest parks in Europe – Englischer Garten. It’s a favorite locals place for the relax, long walks or just a beer meeting in the biggest Biergarten. Unfortunately, I don’t have private photos of this place, but I will try to make up for it as soon as possible! 🙂

Oktoberfest

As I mentioned at the beginning, I visited Munich 17 times. Interestingly, I’ve been only once during the Oktoberfest. 🙂

King Ludwig I married Princess Therese of Saxe-Hildburghausen on October 12, 1810. The citizens of Munich were invited to attend the festivities held on the fields in front of the city gates to celebrate the royal event. The fields were named Theresienwiese (“Theresa’s Meadow”) in honour of the Crown Princess, and have kept that name ever since, although the locals have since abbreviated the name simply to the “Wiesn“. Horse races were held on October 18 to honor the newlyweds .Because the event enjoyed great popularity among the city residents, the Royal Court decided to repeat the race a year later. This is how the tradition of the Munich Oktoberfest was born.

Today it is the largest folk festival that can bring almost 2 million tourists to Munich. Whenever in Oktoberfest you should wear traditional Bavarian outfit. It is expensive, but it is probably the coolest souvenir you can bring from Munich and from all over Bavaria! 🙂  I can recommend C&A – there you will find the cheapest Bavarian costumes. My dress (Dirndl) cost 100 euros.

Munich – a great base to see other cities in Bavaria

Are you tired of Munich? In Bavaria it’s hard to get bored! Thanks to the famous Bayern Ticket you can visit many cool places! Soon on the blog will appear content of my 1-day trip to the surrounding Bavarian cities: Rothenburg ob der Tauber, Nuremberg, Bamberg, Garmisch Partenkirchen, Regensburg, Füssen and Schwangau (Neuschwanstein).

Hold on! Come back sometimes. 🙂

That’s all for now. But I will be updating this post after every single visit in Munich! There will be more pics and cool information. What are your impressions of Munich?

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